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10 Best Fishing Spots in Galveston (2023)

10 Best Fishing Spots in Galveston (2023)

Booking a day trip on a fishing charter is one of the best ways to discover the best fishing spots in Galveston and surrounding areas. However, you don’t need a boat to reel in a fish you’d be proud of since there are plenty of fishing locations in Galveston you can reach by car.

The iconic Galveston’s 61st Street fishing pier, Lee and Joe Jamail Park, or the Galveston Fishing Pier at 9001 Seawall Boulevard are some of the popular fishing spots within the city.

The best part about these spots is that you don’t have to bring your fishing gear since you can rent it on location.

The 10 Best Fishing Spots in Galveston at a Glance

Here are some of the fishing spots in Galveston you shouldn’t miss:

Top 10 Fishing Spots in Galveston in Detail

Let’s take a more detailed view of the best fishing locations in Galveston.

Galveston’s 61st Street Fishing Pier

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The fishing pier on 61st Street has been a part of Galveston’s fishing lore for more than half a century. Visiting the pier is a fun activity for the entire family because you can admire breathtaking views from one of its decks or find plenty of restaurants nearby.

Also, you don’t have to bring your fishing equipment because you can rent it at the pier. You won’t have trouble reeling in a ray or trout even if you decide to travel light.

Type of fishing: Pier fishing

Expect to find: Flounder, rays, trout, black drum

Rules and Safety Guidelines: Occasionally, strong wind

See Galveston’s 61st Street Fishing Pier on the map

Seawolf Park

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The Seawolf Park is a memorial park dedicated to the USS Seawolf submarine. The park is located on Pelican Island in the northern part of Galveston, and you just have to cross the bridge to reach it.

The pier is the most obvious fishing destination on the island, but remember that Seawolf Park is a popular tourist destination and can be very crowded during the spring and summer fishing seasons.

Type of fishing: Pier fishing, surf fishing

Expect to find: Flounder, red drum, trout

Rules and Safety Guidelines: The sea bottom is rocky, and the line can get stuck between the rocks. Some anglers complain about generator noise.

See Seawolf Park on the map

Lee and Joe Jamail Park

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One of Galveston Island’s best fishing locations is only a few miles from the city’s downtown area. Lee and Joe Jamail Park has two fishing piers with plenty of space for recreational anglers to spend a day with their families.

The park’s parking lot is free but has only 23 spots, so finding parking space may not always be easy. Bring your own fishing gear because you won’t find a place that rents fishing equipment close by.

Type of fishing: Pier fishing, night fishing

Expect to find: Trout, flounder

Rules and Safety Guidelines: Don’t litter. There are plenty of trash cans throughout the park.

See Lee and Joe Jamail Park on the map

Galveston Fishing Pier

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Only a short walk away from the fishing pier on 61st Street, the Galveston Fishing Pier on Sewall Boulevard is yet another excellent fishing location for recreational anglers.

The pier is open to the public around the clock, and it is well-lit, which makes it ideal for night or early morning fishing.

Aside from the picnic tables, the pier offers little shade, so sun protection is essential if you plan to spend the day angling there.

Type of fishing: Night fishing, pier fishing

Expect to find: Croaker, bull reds, sheepshead

Rules and Safety Guidelines: The pier can be windy, so dress accordingly.

See Galveston Fishing Pier on the map

Galveston Seawall

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The area around a ten-mile-long Galveston Seawall offers numerous fishing spots, including several beaches.

The area is within walking distance from the 61st Street fishing pier, and it’s a great destination for anglers who don’t want to spend much time searching for a fishing spot.

However, you shouldn’t fish on crowded beaches. Instead, you should find a spot where there aren’t any swimmers nearby. You’ll reach a 20-mile-long beach if you keep moving west of the seawall, where you can surf fish without any restrictions.

Type of fishing: Surf fishing

Expect to find: Red snapper, flounder, and trout

Rules and Safety Guidelines: Avoid this location if the waves are big

See Galveston Sewall on the map

Galveston Island State Park

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You won’t need a fishing license to angle at Galveston Island State Park as long as you stay on the shore. Moreover, the license cost is included in the price if you want to rent a kayak or fish close to the coast.

The state park is located in the western part of Galveston Island and is only 13 miles away from the city’s central area.

Types of fishing: Surf fishing, kayak fishing, wade fishing

Expect to find: Marlin, catfish, red and black drum

Rules and Safety Guidelines: Check the park’s regulations to find out which fish species are protected.

See Galveston Island State Park on the map

Galveston Jetties

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A historic structure at the entrance to Galveston Bay spans over six and a half miles, which makes it one of the longest jetties in the world.

The south jetties are located on the Galveston Island side, while the north Galveston jetties lie on the Bolivar Peninsula side of the entrance to the bay. Both locations are popular among local anglers, but they’re also among the most dangerous fishing spots in Galveston.

Type of fishing: Jetty fishing

Expect to find: Tarpon, speckled trout, redfish

Rules and Safety Guidelines: Check the weather conditions before heading out to Galveston Jetties

See Galveston Jetties on the map

East Galveston Bay

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Crossing from Galveston Island to the Bolivar Peninsula will enable you to explore fishing spots in East Galveston Bay. Optionally, you can charter a boat and explore hundreds of fishing locations you cannot reach from the shore.

The area is home to a diverse marine life, and you can expect to catch anything from redfish to flounder. However, you should decide which species you want to target before heading to the bay so that you can bring the right equipment.

Type of fishing: Offshore fishing, surf fishing, wade fishing

Expect to find: Trout, flounder, and redfish

Rules and Safety Guidelines: Don’t wander off too far away from the shore while wade fishing

See the East Galveston Bay on the map

East End Lagoon

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Spending a day at the East End Lagoon Nature Preserve might be a good option if you don’t want to leave Galveston Island. The lagoon is less than five miles away from the city’s downtown area, and you can reach it by car in under ten minutes.

Besides fishing, you can also go hiking, kayaking, or birdwatching. The best spots to fish in the lagoon include the beachfront or at the mouth of the lagoon.

Type of fishing: Wade fishing, kayak fishing

Expect to find: Trout, redfish

Rules and Safety Guidelines: Strong currents and uneven depth close to the shore

See the East End Lagoon Nature Preserve on the map

Fort Crockett

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You’ll find beautiful fishing spots at one of the beaches in the Fort Crockett Park. The park is a part of the Galveston Seawall area, and it’s near the 61st Street fishing pier.

The beaches in this area are usually crowded during the summer, so finding a good fishing location away from swimmers can be difficult. That’s why the best time to fish at Fort Crockett is early in the morning.

Types of fishing: Surf fishing, wade fishing, kayak fishing

Expect to find: Redfish, trout

Rules and Safety Guidelines: Fishing in this area during the day isn’t recommended due to the high number of swimmers.

See Fort Crockett Park on the map

Key Things to Consider When Choosing Where to Fish in Galveston

You must consider various factors, ranging from the weather conditions to the lure types you want to use. Let’s look at some of the essential factors you must think about when deciding where to fish in Galveston.

  • Strong currents around Galveston Island: Paying attention to the currents is particularly important if you want to go kayak fishing or wade fishing in Galveston.
  • Your target species: Over a thousand fish species live in the Gulf of Mexico, including more than 50 shark species. Knowing which fish you’d like to target will help you choose a location and the equipment.
  • Dangerous locations: Take extra safety measures if you’re planning to fish at Galveston Jetties.
  • Listen to what the locals are saying: Going down to one of the city’s fishing piers and speaking with the locals can help you find a good fishing spot.

Rules for Fishing in Texas

Visiting the Texas Parks and Wildlife website is the easiest way to familiarize yourself with the state’s fishing regulations. For instance, you can only catch sharks, marlin, mackerel, and other game fish with the pole and line.

You must return a fish to the same waters where you caught it, and you cannot use any game fish as bait. Angling without a saltwater or freshwater fishing license in Texas is against the law, and fines range from $100 to $500.

Some state parks allow anglers to fish from the shore without a license, but you must check a park’s rules to determine whether you need a permit. Individuals aged 17 or younger and persons with intellectual disabilities don’t need a license to fish in Texas.

Non-residents can purchase daily or weekly licenses that enable them to fish on all bodies of water.

Fishing Licenses in Texas

All non-residents, except Louisiana and Oklahoma residents older than 65 with valid senior fishing licenses, must purchase a fishing license. You can buy a fishing license online or at local bait stores.

Freshwater packages

  • Resident freshwater package: $30 for Texas residents aged 18 to 65
  • Senior freshwater Package: $12 for Texas residents older than 65
  • Non-resident freshwater package: $58

Saltwater packages

  • Resident saltwater package: $35
  • Senior saltwater package: $17 for Texas residents older than 65
  • Non-resident saltwater package: $63

All-Water packages

  • Resident All-Water Package: $40
  • Year-from-purchase All-Water Package: $47
  • Senior All-Water Package: $22
  • Non-resident All-Water Package: $68

It’s also worth adding that a one-day all-water license for non-residents costs $16, while Texas residents must pay $11 to obtain this license.

How Salted Angler Chose the Best Fishing Spots in Galveston

All members of our team are seasoned anglers who love fishing in the Gulf of Mexico. We relied on their experience while compiling the list of the best fishing spots in Galveston.

The location’s accessibility also played a role in our selection process since our goal was to identify the spots you can easily reach from Galveston Island. In addition, we considered family-friendly locations that offer plenty of other activities, such as birdwatching or hiking.

We excluded the freshwater fishing locations in the Galveston area from consideration, and we only featured saltwater fishing spots in this article.

Please read our editorial policy to learn more about our team and mission.

General FAQs

Is Chartering a Boat in Galveston Worth It?

Chartering a boat is one of the best ways to discover amazing fishing spots in the Gulf of Mexico or Galveston Bay, and most anglers say that it is worth every penny.

What is the Best Location in Galveston for Night Fishing?

The fishing pier on 61st Street is probably the best spot for night fishing in Galveston because it is open 24 hours a day and is well-lit.

What is the Best Time to Visit Galveston?

The peak of the fishing is during the summer, but you should visit Galveston in the winter if you want to target yellowfin tuna or amberjack.

 

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